Author Topic: Reviews: Turok Dinosaur Hunter  (Read 1436 times)

Offline Dinosoid

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Reviews: Turok Dinosaur Hunter
« on: September 01, 2019, 04:50:17 PM »
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« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 04:12:54 PM by Dinosoid »

Offline Dinosoid

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Re: Reviews: Turok Dinosaur Hunter
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2019, 04:50:53 PM »
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« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 04:12:48 PM by Dinosoid »

Offline ZEED

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Re: Reviews: Turok Dinosaur Hunter
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2019, 11:09:00 AM »
TUROK: Dinosaur Hunter - review (N64 version)

I was there...
I didn't get the N64 on launch, in fact when i did eventually get one, i had to sell my beloved S.N.E.S console and hefty games collection to afford it, a hard decision to face at a young age but in the end the N64 and i bonded like no other console to date.
Friends of mine who were lucky enough to already have the console from day one, obviously all had the same game, "SUPER MARIO 64", a genre defining classic but by the time i got my N64 i had already bounced from friends house to friends house and played a large chunk of Mario's wonderful foray into 3D platforming.

The hunt was on...
With each game costing £59:99 (in Pal region) purchasing a new game felt like a real investment and a gamble but something caught my eye, like a fantastic comic book cover, a certain games box art reached out and grabbed me, yes you guessed it...
it was "STAR WARS: Shadows of the Empire"...nah, really it was "TUROK: Dinosaur Hunter".

Onto the game...
Bringing the visceral first person shooter gameplay only found on a PC at the time, "TUROK: Dinosaur Hunter" stood out from the other games available for the N64 in 1997, it demanded a lot from the player, not only did it have the best controller configuration to play a first person shooter on a home console, which in itself required a understanding of movement in 3D space but the level design and open structure was also highly demanding at the time and for some, still to this day.
The fast paced, blistering speed, no holds barred, seat of your pants, roller coaster gameplay mixed with inventive weapons, non linear hub world design, collecting keys in and out of order, crazy enemies, outlandish boss fights, twisted versions of dinosaurs hooked up with weapons, exploration, organic meets sci-fi art direction and the games impressive sound design and rhythmic music, all blended together to make a very unique and individual game, one that obviously struck a chord with many of us here.
Not to mention the ridiculous, fun, gory and over the top death animations, which are still bloody fantastic to this day.
With the game cart slotted into your N64 and with a flick of the power switch, we are greeted by a number of impressive and extremely memorable sequences, the Acclaim logo gets blasted onto our screens, Iggy the iguana is hunted "Zoinks!" and finally Tal'Set is revealed to us before launching a arrow into the main menus title card, a great showcase of the games humour, animation, sound and graphical prowess.

Fast forward...
Playing the game in 2019 and what with the remastered version of the game by Nightdive studios, i still enjoy playing on original hardware and on a lovely CRT TV, the glass screen adds a wonderful sharpness to the image and is a thing of beauty to behold, i highly recommend if you have never played "TUROK: Dinosaur Hunter" on a actual N64 to invest in a CRT glass screen TV, yes they are large, heavy and take up space but you will not believe the quality of the image once displayed through this hardware.
Also when you hit the reset button on the N64 you get a raptor screech!

Final thoughts...
The flow of the game in my opinion is superior than what came in the ambitious sequel "SEEDS OF EVIL" which drops the subtitle "Dinosaur Hunter" (as does the remaster, which refers to itself as just "TUROK" even though the in game title screen still has the "Dinosaur Hunter" subtitle) there's something undeniably pure, bonkers and special about the first game, the level design surprises and rewards you for exploration.
For example, the third level, at the end, where all the pillars are, you find the Chronoscepter piece to the left set of pillars up a climbable set of vines on a wall but take the right set of pillars and you only find some items but you are still missing the final key on this level.
"I must of missed it early on?!"
Take the portal out and you are confronted with a boss, defeat this madman and you are rewarded with the last key to find on this level, simple but effective, engaging and rewarding.
In terms of critique, which i enjoy, the majority of the complaints stem from draw distance, the fogging, platforming sections and back tracking.
These are valid complaints but in all honesty, never bothered or hindered my enjoyment of the game, i find the fogging adds a atmosphere to the levels, even though it is clearly there for technical reasons, the platforming never really bothered me, as coming from the N.E.S generation, where difficult games were common, back tracking is aided by the inclusion of a much needed map overlay, which does not interfere with gameplay, no pausing to look at the map only to forget what you just looked at, having the map overlay on screen during actual gameplay is quite the brilliant move.
I guess some of the shooting collision is a bit off (corrected by the remaster in the options) where shooting from inside a cave for instance to outside a cave with a clear shot of a enemy, sometimes results in the bullets hitting a invisible wall, i could nitpick and so on but the heart and soul of the game comes from a creative place.
There's not much new to say in terms of a review, there are countless far better qualified written reviews of this game than mine, which is why i chose to share my story and experience up front.
This game and the N64 in general, hold a very special and continuous place in my heart, it is not nostalgia as i don't believe in it, i never left the lost land and neither did you!

Thank you for reading, i hope you enjoyed.
-ZEED

   
« Last Edit: September 05, 2019, 08:35:06 PM by ZEED »

Offline Dinomite

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Re: Reviews: Turok Dinosaur Hunter
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2020, 02:25:01 PM »
TUROK: Dinosaur Hunter - review (N64 version)

I was there...
I didn't get the N64 on launch, in fact when i did eventually get one, i had to sell my beloved S.N.E.S console and hefty games collection to afford it, a hard decision to face at a young age but in the end the N64 and i bonded like no other console to date.
Friends of mine who were lucky enough to already have the console from day one, obviously all had the same game, "SUPER MARIO 64", a genre defining classic but by the time i got my N64 i had already bounced from friends house to friends house and played a large chunk of Mario's wonderful foray into 3D platforming.

The hunt was on...
With each game costing £59:99 (in Pal region) purchasing a new game felt like a real investment and a gamble but something caught my eye, like a fantastic comic book cover, a certain games box art reached out and grabbed me, yes you guessed it...
it was "STAR WARS: Shadows of the Empire"...nah, really it was "TUROK: Dinosaur Hunter".

Onto the game...
Bringing the visceral first person shooter gameplay only found on a PC at the time, "TUROK: Dinosaur Hunter" stood out from the other games available for the N64 in 1997, it demanded a lot from the player, not only did it have the best controller configuration to play a first person shooter on a home console, which in itself required a understanding of movement in 3D space but the level design and open structure was also highly demanding at the time and for some, still to this day.
The fast paced, blistering speed, no holds barred, seat of your pants, roller coaster gameplay mixed with inventive weapons, non linear hub world design, collecting keys in and out of order, crazy enemies, outlandish boss fights, twisted versions of dinosaurs hooked up with weapons, exploration, organic meets sci-fi art direction and the games impressive sound design and rhythmic music, all blended together to make a very unique and individual game, one that obviously struck a chord with many of us here.
Not to mention the ridiculous, fun, gory and over the top death animations, which are still bloody fantastic to this day.
With the game cart slotted into your N64 and with a flick of the power switch, we are greeted by a number of impressive and extremely memorable sequences, the Acclaim logo gets blasted onto our screens, Iggy the iguana is hunted "Zoinks!" and finally Tal'Set is revealed to us before launching a arrow into the main menus title card, a great showcase of the games humour, animation, sound and graphical prowess.

Fast forward...
Playing the game in 2019 and what with the remastered version of the game by Nightdive studios, i still enjoy playing on original hardware and on a lovely CRT TV, the glass screen adds a wonderful sharpness to the image and is a thing of beauty to behold, i highly recommend if you have never played "TUROK: Dinosaur Hunter" on a actual N64 to invest in a CRT glass screen TV, yes they are large, heavy and take up space but you will not believe the quality of the image once displayed through this hardware.
Also when you hit the reset button on the N64 you get a raptor screech!

Final thoughts...
The flow of the game in my opinion is superior than what came in the ambitious sequel "SEEDS OF EVIL" which drops the subtitle "Dinosaur Hunter" (as does the remaster, which refers to itself as just "TUROK" even though the in game title screen still has the "Dinosaur Hunter" subtitle) there's something undeniably pure, bonkers and special about the first game, the level design surprises and rewards you for exploration.
For example, the third level, at the end, where all the pillars are, you find the Chronoscepter piece to the left set of pillars up a climbable set of vines on a wall but take the right set of pillars and you only find some items but you are still missing the final key on this level.
"I must of missed it early on?!"
Take the portal out and you are confronted with a boss, defeat this madman and you are rewarded with the last key to find on this level, simple but effective, engaging and rewarding.
In terms of critique, which i enjoy, the majority of the complaints stem from draw distance, the fogging, platforming sections and back tracking.
These are valid complaints but in all honesty, never bothered or hindered my enjoyment of the game, i find the fogging adds a atmosphere to the levels, even though it is clearly there for technical reasons, the platforming never really bothered me, as coming from the N.E.S generation, where difficult games were common, back tracking is aided by the inclusion of a much needed map overlay, which does not interfere with gameplay, no pausing to look at the map only to forget what you just looked at, having the map overlay on screen during actual gameplay is quite the brilliant move.
I guess some of the shooting collision is a bit off (corrected by the remaster in the options) where shooting from inside a cave for instance to outside a cave with a clear shot of a enemy, sometimes results in the bullets hitting a invisible wall, i could nitpick and so on but the heart and soul of the game comes from a creative place.
There's not much new to say in terms of a review, there are countless far better qualified written reviews of this game than mine, which is why i chose to share my story and experience up front.
This game and the N64 in general, hold a very special and continuous place in my heart, it is not nostalgia as i don't believe in it, i never left the lost land and neither did you!

Thank you for reading, i hope you enjoyed.
-ZEED


Great review, man. Glad you made better use of these topics than Dinosoid ever did.

The most hated person on the internet.

 

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